Tag Archives: the ovi magazine

Human Rights by David Sparenberg

ovicover_04_06_16.gifNobody has the right to take me out and shoot me.  To put bullets in my head and body, there against the already bloody wall.  To end me here because my opinions differ.

Nobody has the right to snatch me up in the night, drag me off, interrogate and torture, and leave my battered body to rot in cold fear and darkness.  Or toss my scarcely breathing remains out in a sack, along some grim, black road.  To do this and more because I open my mouth; because I dare to denounce the criminality of silence.

Ah… Nobody…

Nobody has the right to feed on my flesh, to savage my heart, to rip out and devour and suck dry my soul.  Or to feast on my family, my children.  To preach and to practice hatred against those whose speech is unfamiliar, and who look and pray, eat and dress differently.

Nobody has the right to do any of this.  To commit these crimes against my humanity, or against you.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

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Suicidal Nuclear Gambit on Caucasus By Petra Posega

ovicover_03_06_16.gifNuclear security is seemingly in the vanguard of global attention, but the large framework of international provisions is increasingly perceived as a toothless tiger. In the contemporary age where asymmetric threats to security are one of the most dangerous ones, the time is high to mitigate the risk of rouge actors having potential access to materials, necessary to develop nuclear weapons.

Nowhere is this urgency more pivotal than in already turbulent areas, such as the South Caucasus. With many turmoil instabilities, lasting for decades with no completely bulletproof conflict resolution process installed, adding a threat of nuclear weapons potential means creating a house of cards that can cause complete collapse of regional peace and stability. That is precisely why recently uncovered and reoccurring actions of Armenia towards the goal of building its own nuclear capacity must be addressed more seriously. They should also attract bolder response to ensure safety of the region is sustained.

According to the report by Vienna-based nuclear watch-dog, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Armenia has established quite a record of illegal trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials. There have been a couple of serious incidents spanning from 1999 onward. A large number of reported incidents has occurred on the country`s border with Georgia, tempting the IAEA to conclude there is high probability that the so called Armenian route does in fact exist. There is a further evidence to support this assertion. There were an unusually high number of Armenians caught in nuclear trafficking activities. Additionally, some of the reported incidents that made their way to the official reports suggested that the main focus of trafficking activities is in fact smuggling of nuclear material that could be used for nuclear weapons capabilities. There were also reports suggesting the trafficking of other radioactive material that could be utilized for alternate purposes, such as the building of a so called dirty bomb. Since the stakes with nuclear weaponry are always high to the extreme, the recognition of this threat must not be underrated and dismissed easily.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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Ganguly’s pseudo-analysis of Bangladesh by Dr. Habib Siddiqui

ovicover_02_06_16After reading Sumit Ganguly’s article – Bangladesh’s Accommodation of Extremism Spells Danger for Region (YaleGlobal Online) – I could not believe that I was reading an analysis from someone who holds the Rabindranath Tagore Chair in Indian Cultures and Civilizations at Indiana University, Bloomington, and is a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, Philadelphia. I feel sorry to state that it is a terrible piece.

It’s a disingenuous attempt by Ganguly to analyze Bangladesh. As an Indian-American of Bengali heritage his piece is full of dada babu (condescending, big brotherly) attitude, which many Bangladeshis would find very offensive. He describes Bangladesh as the “mostly poverty-stricken nation”, while hiding the fact that in his native India there are more beggars than found in Bangladesh. Hundreds of millions of Indians don’t have the necessary sanitary and health care facilities. On some of the Human Development Indices, India’s record is simply abysmal and much worse than those of Bangladesh.

Religion is important to most South Asians. The subject matter would have benefited from an objective analysis and not something that is shallow and highly opinionated from an individual whose piece was unnecessarily too long and short on facts, analysis, structure and reflection.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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Old Technology Meets New Technology by Leah Sellers

“Gol’ dang it, Theodore Joseph !ovicover_01_06_16  Get that gol’ durned Drone out of the Barn.  Right now, young man !”  Mr. Hopper hollered at his distracted Son.

No sooner than Mr. Hopper hopped all over his errant teen-ager, a flock of eight chickens flew hither and dither out of the Barn’s wide open back doors squawking and fussing about the strange featherless Flying Creature terrorizing them out of their usual afternoon henpecking domain.

“No wonder your Mama’s Layin’ Hens have stopped layin’,”  Mr. Hopper continued hollering.  “I mean it, T.J..  Get that Machine outta’ the Barn.  I told you to fly that cock-a-mamey thing out at the bottom of the Field.  Away from the House, away from the Barn and away from all of the Critters, gol’ dang it !”

“Alright, Dad.  But how else am I gonna’ learn how to fly my Drone if I don’t practice every chance I get ?”  Theodore Joseph asked plaintively.

 

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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Aware – Stop

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by | May 9, 2016 · 7:43 pm

From Ovi bookshelves #31 & 32

bk_en_31bk_en_32

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Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941): The Local and the Universal by Rene Wadlow

ovicover_07_05_16In a period of rapid change as we face today, it is often difficult to find the right balance between the cultural contributions and needs of the local, the national, and the universal.  One way of finding this balance is to look at the life and work of others, who earlier confronted the same challenges.  One such person was the poet, writer and cultural reformer Rabindranath Tagore. As Amiya Chakravarty, a literary secretary of Tagore wrote  “Each individual must strike the ‘universal concrete’ in terms of his own creative effort, in the milieu of his own cultural heritage.  Only by proceeding from wherever we are, geographically, spiritually or vocationally, can we make the integral effort for peace.  The peace-workers belong to the entire human family, using the language or religious associations to which he has been born, and which he transforms, not necessarily by revolt but by inner transcendence.” (1)

Rabindranath Tagore  was the Renaissance man of modern India — the bridge from an Indian culture dominated on the one hand by a traditionalism that had long ceased to be creative and on the other by English colonial practice whose reforms were self-interested.  He was known world wide as a poet having received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913.  His aim was to combine a renewal of local thought, in particular that of his native Bengal, with an appreciation of the cultures of the world. The motto of the educational center he founded, Visva-Bharati, was “Where the world makes its home in a single nest.”

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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