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by | July 7, 2016 · 4:53 pm

Chilcot May have saved Corbyn and stopped Brexit by Thanos Kalamidas

ovicover_07_07_16The say that when it comes to bad news they have the tendency to come all together and for Britain July 6th was another day with more bad news. Well not for everybody. Chairman Sir John Chilcot delivered the results of UK’s Iraq War inquiry concluding that: the invasion was not the “last resort” action presented to MPs and the public. There was no “imminent threat” from Saddam, and that Tony Blair overstated the threat posed by Saddam Hussein, sent ill-prepared troops into battle and had “wholly inadequate” plans for the aftermath.

In other words, Tony Blair lied and screwed up big, criminally, globally, consequencing the death of hundreds of thousands. The man has blood on his hands and he will pay for that. Tony Blair was not alone when he lied and cheated, he had accomplices and I don’t mean this reptile spin-doctor Alistair Campbell, only. He had all this bunch of cronies in the Labour Party going under the New Labour brand. And most of them – minor Gordon Brown – are still here. Trying to force policies and agendas.

Jeremy Corbyn did a lot of mistakes during the Brexit-Remain campaign, his main one was that he was not into it. The man didn’t inspire much of remain and after the result there were many – inside and outside the Labour Party – that would have bet that he didn’t even vote for remain himself. He restricted himself into cliché announces and speeches leaving the field for the Tories. After all, it was them who had turned the whole thing into an internal conflict, Boris Vis David. Why not make the best of it after the humiliating defeat in 2015 general elections?

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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The F-Word and/or F-Bomb by Leah Sellers

ovicover_05_07_16Well, sir, what an interesting Word to have flung at Oneself.
“Give me an F, Give me a U, Give me a C, Give me a K….”

In the past the F-Word’s origins were derived from Folks who Gardened.  Yes, when an Ancient Agrarian Pioneer chose a straight Stick with which to Poke a Hole into the Ground in order to insert his Seed….his Vegetable and/ or Fruit Seeds, in order to, after much nurturing, sustaining and Watering, Feed his Family, Friends and Community.

Wonder if He and/or She ever chanted “Give me an F, Give me a U, give me a C, give me a K….” ?  The F-Word Chant does have a rather Rhythmical appeal.

Yes, this chant has a tendency to make the one ejaculating it to sound like a jumping, humping, shaking, quaking Cheerleader, sir.  A Cheerleader at a Gang F-Word.  A Gang R-Word…“Give me a R, Give me an A, Give me a P, Give me an E…”

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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The emergence of a new patrimonial art Kovach Imre Barna and Murray Hunter

ovicover_08_05_16Metaphorically, new art trends are like volcanoes. They erupt along the tectonic fault lines of colliding and shifting cultures. No one can predict when an eruption will occur. Nor can the length and magnitude be known until after the event.

Art goes through violent changes when cultures shift, leading to new trends and paradigms, due to the tectonic nature of cultural vista.

Today’s art world is a very well mapped out universe consisting of a few thousand leading galleries, museums, a few hundred influential curators and art fair organizers, writers and critics, wealthy collectors and institutions, and of course, the artists themselves.

The artwork is a USD 64 billion a year industry. It mirrors socio-economic trends and itself has become globalized, with different regions within.

Contemporary art is considered a financial asset class, where the promotion, investment, and protection of this asset has taken on priority within the art industry.

Art has become financialized. Financial institutions and fund managers have joined art collectors in creating their respective portfolios of art. Today’s definition of good art is that it is saleable and the definition of a good artist is that he or she is marketable.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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Hungary’s Unacknowledged Leadership by Prof. Michael R. Czinkota

ovicover_06_05_16.gifHungary has a strategic position in the heart of Europe. The country offers a highly developed logistics system. Its traditional role as a trading post make it important as a regional production and distribution center.  Porsche, General Motors, and Audi are now producing many of their cars in Hungary – with other suppliers working for and close by. A recent investment by Mercedes Benz re-affirms the auto cluster formation in Hungary. The significant development of industries like information technology, electronics and automotive has attracted Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) at a rising rate.  Hungary’s acceptance as a member of the European Union and the Schengen Zone further boosted its own and its European partners economic, social and political development and stimulated more R&D activities.

All this is now jeopardized because of major EU internal strife over immigration policies. I observed the early stage of human flow between Serbia and Hungary which was then a 200 kilometer long green zone. Groups of 30 to 50 men, women and children slowly walked across the border. The local chief of police shrugged, since he neither had the manpower nor the physical resources to round up or process the waves of humanity. In 2015, more than 400,000 people entered Hungary from Serbia, aiming to settle in Germany, France or Britain. The march through Hungary used to encounter an ostrich policy of “carry on and ignore”. But the people who immigrate were worn out and not any less hungry because they were in Hungary. To rest, or feed themselves, they trespassed on property and took fruits and other food. Locals were weary and talked about organized protection for their harvest. Pressures and complaints are like sparks in a tinder box.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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Irshad Manji on Faith, Freedom, Human Rights and Love by Dr. Emanuel Paparella

ovicover_05_05_16This is a follow-up to my previous piece on the attitude of liberal societies toward religious belief. It was argued there that the stratagem of opposing intolerant social norms as practices by some Muslim communities vis a vis women, gays, human rights and freedom in general (be it of speech, or political, or artistic); that is to say, opposing certain religiously condoned intolerances and orthodoxies with a libertarian “enlightened” secular discourse (which usually advocates the liquidation of religion per se, at best tolerating a mere vapid cafeteria-style sort of “spirituality”) is an inadequate, clever by half, solution to the problem at hand. It makes those who feel that their faith is under attack all the more determined to defend it zealously. In Islam they call that kind of extreme defense Jihad and it has been carried in one form or another for centuries now.

What usually happens is that the table adroitly gets turned around and the “enlightened” “progressive” secularist alleging human rights violations that need to be abolished ends up getting himself accused of intolerance, of trying to impose his particular brand of intolerance, i.e., his secularism, on believers. This is particularly true in societies where religion has been abandoned as just another myth or lie, long superseded by modernity progressive positivistic science. Not to be modern is to be medieval, obscurantist, retrograde, undesirables who cannot be accommodated in a modern progressive society based on the tenets of the Enlightenment, a la Voltaire.

This approach usually misfires and ends up producing more animosity and intolerance with accusations of zealotry and extremism on both sides of the fence. There is however a much better approach and it is that advocated by the influential philosopher Jurgen Habermas in his essay “A post-secular Europe” and that of the Ugandan born Canadian Muslim Irshad Manji, author of two best-selling influential books: The Trouble with Islam Today (translated into 30 languages), and How to Reconcile Faith and Freedom.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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Tragedy by Dr Elsa Lycias Joel

ovicover_03_05_16As the ongoing news series on Kollam tragedy surfaces, Incredible India is not all that it’s cracked up to be, especially our living temples. It is a matter of national shame that despite more and more fire accidents, there is no national or state level policy that addresses this goof up as such. Given the agitation and persuasion from the people’s side to host the “Kambam” calling it a tradition, there is no doubt that temple festivals have wound their way out of all legal, political and moral conundrums to become a law unto themselves. It annoys me when an incident as this is described as a ‘Tragedy’ when it’s actually a ‘fallout’ of unwarranted deeds and the repetitive nature of temple festivals and accidents. Considerable suspension of disbelief I required to come to terms with the affected lot calling “Kambam” a tradition that can’t be banned. Fatalistic Indian!! Or is it his thought process orbicular that life’s inequalities tend to follow him around!

The past few days have shown just how difficult it is for the Kerala government to put up with the fire tragedy and confront the challenges. Though the discomforts with banning fireworks have been visible for a long time now and especially after the clamor for a blanket ban grew louder, it’s ridiculous that the government is still unprepared for the starkness with which a wise choice should be articulated. The choice is actually quite simple for the government: Ban the production and sale of fireworks or review the regulations and measures of The Explosive rules, 2008 to limit the sale of fireworks thereby include necessary prohibitions on the importation, sale, possession and use of fireworks in public places or places of worship even late at night. If the government is concerned that a ban could lead to an unregulated black market in illegal fireworks, then they should be at least working on the enforcement of the existing measures. For now, the spectacle is shocking.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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