Tag Archives: philosophy

Carl G. Jung: Evolution Toward the Higher Self by Rene Wadlow

Carl Gustav Jung (26 July 1875 – 6 June 1961), the Swiss psychiatrist, was the founder of an important current of psychoanalysis which he called “analytical psychology”. Jung’s contribution to a deeper understanding of Taoist thought is stressed in an earlier essay. He provides means for deciphering individual behavior but also challenges facing the wider society. His ideas have had an influence on other disciplines such as religious studies and literary analysis.

jung01_400(For more about Carl G. Jung’s life read: Carl G. Jung: The Integration of Opposites by Rene Wadlow)

Jung developed his insights at a particular time in history, a time of reconstruction and searching after the 1914-1918 war and the time that saw the rise of Hitler and the start of the 1939-1945 war. After the Second World War, he largely revised some of his earlier writings and turned his attention to Chinese and Indian philosophy. He recorded his life experiences which were then edited by his long-time secretary Amiela Jaffé as Memories, Dreams, Refections published after his 1961 death. She later wrote her own appreciation Amiela Jaffé. From the Life and Work of C.G. Jung (1972)

Much of his writings were based on intuition. He recognized the importance of gender issues, of nationalism, and the power of religious motivations in an apparently irreligious epoch. Much of his influence is not so much his conclusions as his intuitions about directions to explore. There are similarities between Jung and the more recent writings of Abraham Maslow whose psychology is based on the idea that there are “higher reaches of human nature.” Both men were more interested in the sense of affirmation rather than neurosis.

For more of this article please check HERE!

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Venomous World by Nikos Laios

ovicover_01_12_16The world is filled with so much venom and conflict at the moment in just about every field of human interaction and endeavour, be it politics, economics or international relations.

At the dawn of the 21st century, the problems that we face as a species are increasing rapidly in our overcrowded world as we stretch the finite resources that this planet has to offer. Rather than meet in a peaceful communion and transcend our differences to solve our problems, we have instead resorted to primitive rivalry and competition and the problems that we face in the meantime are mounting. The late American scientist Carl Sagan said about life on our planet in his documentary, ‘Pale Blue Dot: A Vision Of The Human Future In Space’ the following: “Consider again that dot [Earth]. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilisation, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

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Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941): The Local and the Universal by Rene Wadlow

ovicover_07_05_16In a period of rapid change as we face today, it is often difficult to find the right balance between the cultural contributions and needs of the local, the national, and the universal.  One way of finding this balance is to look at the life and work of others, who earlier confronted the same challenges.  One such person was the poet, writer and cultural reformer Rabindranath Tagore. As Amiya Chakravarty, a literary secretary of Tagore wrote  “Each individual must strike the ‘universal concrete’ in terms of his own creative effort, in the milieu of his own cultural heritage.  Only by proceeding from wherever we are, geographically, spiritually or vocationally, can we make the integral effort for peace.  The peace-workers belong to the entire human family, using the language or religious associations to which he has been born, and which he transforms, not necessarily by revolt but by inner transcendence.” (1)

Rabindranath Tagore  was the Renaissance man of modern India — the bridge from an Indian culture dominated on the one hand by a traditionalism that had long ceased to be creative and on the other by English colonial practice whose reforms were self-interested.  He was known world wide as a poet having received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913.  His aim was to combine a renewal of local thought, in particular that of his native Bengal, with an appreciation of the cultures of the world. The motto of the educational center he founded, Visva-Bharati, was “Where the world makes its home in a single nest.”

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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4 News for Ovi bookshelves

4 new EBooks from the Ovi bookshelves, get your FREE copy NOW HERE! and enjoy!

Mount Voio is a photography album from a magnificent Greek landmark accompanied with the poems of a well-known Greek poet.

Mount Voio is one of Greece’s most highly inhabited and forested mountains. Its rich ecosystems, which include numerous mixed forests, consist mainly of oaks, chestnut trees, beech trees, pines, firs and low bushes.  Voio is an ideal habitat for all kinds of wild animals found in northern. And photographed by Ioli Petroulaki.

Get a FREE copy, HERE!

Ovi Symposium Part I. The Ovi symposium is a landmark for the Ovi magazine. A symposium organized beyond time and space. A multidimensional symposium “On the Nature of Art within Modernity & the Envisioning of a New Humanism”. Participants from four different continents under the direction of Professor Emanuel Paparella in a dialogue that goes beyond linear time.

This is the first book and it covers the first thirteen meetings of a symposium – 6 June-21 November 2013 – that continues with its 55th meeting on the 2nd of July 2015; tomorrow. Participants in this huge project in alphabetical order: Dr Alessandra Abis, Dr Maria Buccolo, Ms Abigail George, Mr Nikos Laios, Dr Lawrence Nannery, Dr Ernesto Paolozzi, Dr Emanuel Paparella, Mr Edwin Rywalt and Dr Michael Vena.

Get a FREE copy, HERE!

Brother Wolf and Sister Wren is a collection of short stories written by the talented Ms Abigail George. All her stories come from the heart of South Africa projecting the spirit of the rainbow but also for long tortured state.

Brother Wolf and Sister Wren is Abigail George’s way to invite to into the secrets of the soul of this land. Brother wolf and sister wren are full of deep feelings, inspirations and energy. You just have to try to follow them. Abigail’s short stories are accompanied but the equally inspirational illustrations made by Thanos Raftopoulos.

Get a FREE copy, HERE!

Life in the Age of Extinctions volume 2 – Threshold is David Sparenberg’s closure after three years following the path his soul followed and mother earth led him. A path that started with his first book, “Life in the Age of Extinctions volume 1” also published by Ovi magazine.

David is contemporary as much his message is eternal. His thoughts float full of energy, embracing wishes, thoughts and dreams. Tens of thousands read his first book, a book he was extending his hand to meet you, in his second book he is embracing the reader, he joins the reader in search of harmony.

Get a FREE copy, HERE!

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Ovi Symposium; forty-sixth Meeting

The Ovi Symposium has reached its forty-sixth meeting. The subtheme for this meeting is: “The Limits of Free Speech”.

For this meeting participants are: Ms Abigail George, Mr Nikos Laios, Drs. Paolozzi, Paparella, and Mr Rywalt

You can read everything HERE!

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Ovi Symposium; forty-fourth Meeting

Ovi Symposium: “A Philosophical Conversation on the Nature of Art within Modernity and the Envisioning Ovi Symposiumof a New Humanism” between Ms Abigail George, Mr Nikos Laios, Drs. Paolozzi, Paparella and Mr. Rywalt Forty-fourth Meeting: 29 January 2015

Subtheme of session 44: Whatever happened to the love of ideas?

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Benedetto Croce: The Philosophy of History and the Duty of Freedom

Professor Ernesto Paolozzi is the new addition for the Ovi Team and the first chapter of his book “Benedetto Croce: The Philosophy of History and the Duty of Freedom” is his first contribution. 

ovicover_25_02_13“A good method to understand a philosopher, as Croce suggests, is to ask with whom he engaged in polemics and what problems he attempted to solve. In other words, he must be historicized, understood in the concrete existence of a man steeped in life, in the history of his times. There are those who will say that in so doing one invites relativism and, consequently, skepticism. To be sure, this is a risk that one must take. But to do the opposite would entail deducing from the living work of an author a series of dead and abstract formulas, to be fitted into a mosaic with other abstruse and incomprehensible theories that would make up a history of philosophy that to many students (but also to many scholars who do not dare admit it) seems a series of oddities from Plato’s Hyper Uranium to Popper’s third world, from Leibniz’s monads to Kant’s transcendentalism, and so on.

The interpreter’s difficulties consist in comprehending what is universal in the particular, that is, what is still living, interesting for us in the work of the philosopher we want to understand. To historicize Croce, in our case, means reconstructing his problems and his reasons by trying to catch those aspects of his thought that can lead us in the right direction by confronting our problems, and in strengthening our reasons. This means making Croce our contemporary, freeing him from the antiquarian history of Nietzschean memory in which we have tried, in the last few years (after a long period of harsh and prejudiced polemic) to imprison him.”

You can find the rest in the pages of Ovi magazine.

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