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by | May 9, 2016 · 7:43 pm

The emergence of a new patrimonial art Kovach Imre Barna and Murray Hunter

ovicover_08_05_16Metaphorically, new art trends are like volcanoes. They erupt along the tectonic fault lines of colliding and shifting cultures. No one can predict when an eruption will occur. Nor can the length and magnitude be known until after the event.

Art goes through violent changes when cultures shift, leading to new trends and paradigms, due to the tectonic nature of cultural vista.

Today’s art world is a very well mapped out universe consisting of a few thousand leading galleries, museums, a few hundred influential curators and art fair organizers, writers and critics, wealthy collectors and institutions, and of course, the artists themselves.

The artwork is a USD 64 billion a year industry. It mirrors socio-economic trends and itself has become globalized, with different regions within.

Contemporary art is considered a financial asset class, where the promotion, investment, and protection of this asset has taken on priority within the art industry.

Art has become financialized. Financial institutions and fund managers have joined art collectors in creating their respective portfolios of art. Today’s definition of good art is that it is saleable and the definition of a good artist is that he or she is marketable.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941): The Local and the Universal by Rene Wadlow

ovicover_07_05_16In a period of rapid change as we face today, it is often difficult to find the right balance between the cultural contributions and needs of the local, the national, and the universal.  One way of finding this balance is to look at the life and work of others, who earlier confronted the same challenges.  One such person was the poet, writer and cultural reformer Rabindranath Tagore. As Amiya Chakravarty, a literary secretary of Tagore wrote  “Each individual must strike the ‘universal concrete’ in terms of his own creative effort, in the milieu of his own cultural heritage.  Only by proceeding from wherever we are, geographically, spiritually or vocationally, can we make the integral effort for peace.  The peace-workers belong to the entire human family, using the language or religious associations to which he has been born, and which he transforms, not necessarily by revolt but by inner transcendence.” (1)

Rabindranath Tagore  was the Renaissance man of modern India — the bridge from an Indian culture dominated on the one hand by a traditionalism that had long ceased to be creative and on the other by English colonial practice whose reforms were self-interested.  He was known world wide as a poet having received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913.  His aim was to combine a renewal of local thought, in particular that of his native Bengal, with an appreciation of the cultures of the world. The motto of the educational center he founded, Visva-Bharati, was “Where the world makes its home in a single nest.”

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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EARTH AT RISK II (Ovi Posters)

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by | May 9, 2016 · 7:34 pm

EARTH AT RISK (Ovi Posters)

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by | April 3, 2016 · 9:20 am

Films that made history #6 (Ovi poster)

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by | March 19, 2016 · 10:43 am

Sir Richard Burton: A Gnostic Bridge to Asian Culture by Rene Wadlow

ovicover_19_03_16As Edward Rice stresses in his biography of Richard Burton, whose birth anniversary we mark on 19 March, “Burton’s adult life was passed in a ceaseless quest for the kind of secret knowledge he labeled broadly as ‘Gnosis’ by which he hoped to uncover the very source of existence and the meaning of his role on earth.” (1)

Historically, the word ‘gnosis’ means knowledge, a certain interior, intuitive cognition, sometimes called ‘the gnosis of the heart’ by which the ‘awake’ individual is able to understand the transcendental presence within himself. The mystical experience of the gnosis is most often set into myth and folk tales. Burton believed that the same gnosis was in the background of all myths, and he studied Hindu Tantra, Sikhism and Kablalah but his most lasting interest was in Islamic Sufism.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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