International Children’s Day – 1 June

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According to Unicef as of 2013, there are an estimated 168 million children aged five to 17 worldwide who are involved with child labour.

Every year, there are more than three million reports of child abuse made in the United States alone, involving more than six million children.

Approximately 20% of women and five to 10% of men report being sexually abused as children, while 23% of people report being physically abused as children. Additionally, many children are subjected to emotional abuse – sometimes called psychological abuse – and to neglect.

Every year, there are an estimated 34,000 homicide deaths in children under the age of 15.

Pneumonia is one of the single largest killers of children under five and it is the leading infectious cause of childhood mortality. In 2013, it killed nearly 2,600 children a day.

Education is a great driver of social, economic and political progress. Yet 69 million adolescents – in low-income countries – are receiving no post-primary education. Children are denied an education because of unaffordable costs, gender discrimination, humanitarian crises and child labour.

Female genital mutilation is mainly carried out on girls under the age of 15. According to the World Health Organisation, more than 125 million girls and women alive today have been cut in the 29 countries in Africa and the Middle East where FGM is concentrated.

Each year, 15 million girls are married as children, and denied their right to health, education and opportunity. Some are married as young as eight or nine. One of the most common causes of death for girls aged 15 to 19 in developing countries is pregnancy and childbirth.

By the end of August 2014, the UN estimated 6.5 million people had been displaced in Syria, while more than three million refugees had fled to countries such as Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey – around half of the three million are children.

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