The Works of Arman Nobari

ovicover_11_02_13Check Ovi magazine and a new arrival for the Ovi team! Arman Nobari and his work is HERE!

“I come from a very culturally mixed background and upbringing, with stories of my relatives escaping Iran in the 70’s, or experiencing racism in the United States during this same time. Many of my pieces attempt to interact with the dialogue between cultures – comparing and contrasting with the 1st and 3rd world, showing how vastly different we are, yet also how incredibly similar. I bridge the culture-gap through emotions, as everyone regardless of their upbringing or culture can understand fear, love, happiness, and remorse.

I taught myself how to paint when I was 19, and started painting fulltime when I was 20. By using minimalistic features in my artwork, I leave a lot to the viewer to “fill in” – I believe this creates the same sensation as a nostalgic memory, further increasing how deeply someone is able to connect to my work.”

More to come from Arman soon including paintings and articles.

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One response to “The Works of Arman Nobari

  1. I come from a very culturally mixed background and upbringing, with stories of my relatives escaping Iran in the 70’s, or experiencing racism in the United States during this same time. Many of my pieces attempt to interact with the dialogue between cultures – comparing and contrasting with the 1st and 3rd world, showing how vastly different we are, yet also how incredibly similar. I bridge the culture-gap through emotions, as everyone regardless of their upbringing or culture can understand fear, love, happiness, and remorse.I taught myself how to paint when I was 19, and started painting fulltime when I was 20. By using minimalistic features in my artwork, I leave a lot to the viewer to “fill in” – I believe this creates the same sensation as a nostalgic memory, further increasing how deeply someone is able to connect to my work.Before I taught myself how to paint I would do street art in California, working with large posters and wheatpaste, stickers, and “mops” – a kind of improvised marker pen. I’d write empowering, motivating things instead of just putting my name out there. Things like “You’re beautiful” or “Your tie looks sharp” would be propagated in heavily urban areas, and while for many people there wouldn’t be a connection, I always hoped the one person who might have needed that message that day received it through my graffiti.All of my art benefits others in one way or another. Even struggling to get by, I always make donations of food purchased with proceeds from my at sales, to give to the homeless. I feel that this completes the “circle” between my art depicting differences in culture, as the homeless in America have a cultural stigma associated with them, and many consider them “second-class”. By helping them directly, my art is able to leave the canvas and directly spread it’s message into the lives of those who need it most.

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