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by | May 9, 2016 · 7:43 pm

The emergence of a new patrimonial art Kovach Imre Barna and Murray Hunter

ovicover_08_05_16Metaphorically, new art trends are like volcanoes. They erupt along the tectonic fault lines of colliding and shifting cultures. No one can predict when an eruption will occur. Nor can the length and magnitude be known until after the event.

Art goes through violent changes when cultures shift, leading to new trends and paradigms, due to the tectonic nature of cultural vista.

Today’s art world is a very well mapped out universe consisting of a few thousand leading galleries, museums, a few hundred influential curators and art fair organizers, writers and critics, wealthy collectors and institutions, and of course, the artists themselves.

The artwork is a USD 64 billion a year industry. It mirrors socio-economic trends and itself has become globalized, with different regions within.

Contemporary art is considered a financial asset class, where the promotion, investment, and protection of this asset has taken on priority within the art industry.

Art has become financialized. Financial institutions and fund managers have joined art collectors in creating their respective portfolios of art. Today’s definition of good art is that it is saleable and the definition of a good artist is that he or she is marketable.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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From Ovi bookshelves #31 & 32

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Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941): The Local and the Universal by Rene Wadlow

ovicover_07_05_16In a period of rapid change as we face today, it is often difficult to find the right balance between the cultural contributions and needs of the local, the national, and the universal.  One way of finding this balance is to look at the life and work of others, who earlier confronted the same challenges.  One such person was the poet, writer and cultural reformer Rabindranath Tagore. As Amiya Chakravarty, a literary secretary of Tagore wrote  “Each individual must strike the ‘universal concrete’ in terms of his own creative effort, in the milieu of his own cultural heritage.  Only by proceeding from wherever we are, geographically, spiritually or vocationally, can we make the integral effort for peace.  The peace-workers belong to the entire human family, using the language or religious associations to which he has been born, and which he transforms, not necessarily by revolt but by inner transcendence.” (1)

Rabindranath Tagore  was the Renaissance man of modern India — the bridge from an Indian culture dominated on the one hand by a traditionalism that had long ceased to be creative and on the other by English colonial practice whose reforms were self-interested.  He was known world wide as a poet having received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913.  His aim was to combine a renewal of local thought, in particular that of his native Bengal, with an appreciation of the cultures of the world. The motto of the educational center he founded, Visva-Bharati, was “Where the world makes its home in a single nest.”

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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EARTH AT RISK II (Ovi Posters)

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by | May 9, 2016 · 7:34 pm

Hungary’s Unacknowledged Leadership by Prof. Michael R. Czinkota

ovicover_06_05_16.gifHungary has a strategic position in the heart of Europe. The country offers a highly developed logistics system. Its traditional role as a trading post make it important as a regional production and distribution center.  Porsche, General Motors, and Audi are now producing many of their cars in Hungary – with other suppliers working for and close by. A recent investment by Mercedes Benz re-affirms the auto cluster formation in Hungary. The significant development of industries like information technology, electronics and automotive has attracted Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) at a rising rate.  Hungary’s acceptance as a member of the European Union and the Schengen Zone further boosted its own and its European partners economic, social and political development and stimulated more R&D activities.

All this is now jeopardized because of major EU internal strife over immigration policies. I observed the early stage of human flow between Serbia and Hungary which was then a 200 kilometer long green zone. Groups of 30 to 50 men, women and children slowly walked across the border. The local chief of police shrugged, since he neither had the manpower nor the physical resources to round up or process the waves of humanity. In 2015, more than 400,000 people entered Hungary from Serbia, aiming to settle in Germany, France or Britain. The march through Hungary used to encounter an ostrich policy of “carry on and ignore”. But the people who immigrate were worn out and not any less hungry because they were in Hungary. To rest, or feed themselves, they trespassed on property and took fruits and other food. Locals were weary and talked about organized protection for their harvest. Pressures and complaints are like sparks in a tinder box.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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Irshad Manji on Faith, Freedom, Human Rights and Love by Dr. Emanuel Paparella

ovicover_05_05_16This is a follow-up to my previous piece on the attitude of liberal societies toward religious belief. It was argued there that the stratagem of opposing intolerant social norms as practices by some Muslim communities vis a vis women, gays, human rights and freedom in general (be it of speech, or political, or artistic); that is to say, opposing certain religiously condoned intolerances and orthodoxies with a libertarian “enlightened” secular discourse (which usually advocates the liquidation of religion per se, at best tolerating a mere vapid cafeteria-style sort of “spirituality”) is an inadequate, clever by half, solution to the problem at hand. It makes those who feel that their faith is under attack all the more determined to defend it zealously. In Islam they call that kind of extreme defense Jihad and it has been carried in one form or another for centuries now.

What usually happens is that the table adroitly gets turned around and the “enlightened” “progressive” secularist alleging human rights violations that need to be abolished ends up getting himself accused of intolerance, of trying to impose his particular brand of intolerance, i.e., his secularism, on believers. This is particularly true in societies where religion has been abandoned as just another myth or lie, long superseded by modernity progressive positivistic science. Not to be modern is to be medieval, obscurantist, retrograde, undesirables who cannot be accommodated in a modern progressive society based on the tenets of the Enlightenment, a la Voltaire.

This approach usually misfires and ends up producing more animosity and intolerance with accusations of zealotry and extremism on both sides of the fence. There is however a much better approach and it is that advocated by the influential philosopher Jurgen Habermas in his essay “A post-secular Europe” and that of the Ugandan born Canadian Muslim Irshad Manji, author of two best-selling influential books: The Trouble with Islam Today (translated into 30 languages), and How to Reconcile Faith and Freedom.

Read the whole article in Ovi Magazine, HERE!

 

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