World Cancer Day

World Cancer Day posters

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Quote of the day

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by | January 18, 2016 · 11:34 am

Aware wishes for 2016

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by | January 2, 2016 · 10:42 am

The Magic Inside

xmas_400“North Pole. Maybe the coldest place to be. Blinding, bright white snow to where eyes can see. Short, frozen days and long, dark nights. “Of course they are dark! They are nights!”

Shhhhh! I’m trying to tell a story here.

“Now, where was I? Oh, right. Night falls quickly around here. And beautiful nights they are! Northern lights are waving in smooth and bright colours and reflect on the snow making the whole place shining like being under a huge disco ball. Everyone in Santa’s workshop when their shift is over, grab the guitars, the drums, the flutes and the trumpets, the accordions and run out. Some play the violin; and as always, the twin elves, Miny and Mo are carrying their piano gasping with their pink tongues hanging out of their identical mouths, for a sonata with four hands in D major. “It’s B-flat major, you dummy”, Miny tries to correct me. “It’s Mo! Miny said about the “dark” nights!”

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It’s an Ovi Christmas tradition. Just like the Christmas tree. A Christmas story.

From our very beginnings, kids have been one of our priorities and we always try to find ways to give them something especially to the ones between the ages of 5 and 105! So now, Mika Moose and the magpie, have new friends in the fantastic world of Santa’s workshop. Rudolph the snail and Joe the brave dog. These two are amazing and just the beginning in a worlds full of magic.

Rudolph and Joe came from a great story teller, Katerina Charisi to Santa’s workshop and we are all Christmassy grateful!

To enjoy this book you must read it aloud to your kids, your grandkids, any kids and make sure that you make all the right voices!

You can download for FREE the book HERE!

Merry Christmas

Thanos Kalamidas

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Season Greetings but …remember!

Season Greeting from Ovi magazine
and remember!

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11 years standing for democracy

ovi01Today, December 20th, is Ovi’s big day! Birthday. Eleven (11) years! Eleven years full of adventures, good and bad times, but most importantly always here a defender of democracy and free speech.

It is hard to explain how we survived these eleven years without any funding and only principals. Sometimes it doesn’t make sense even to us, especially since most of the magazines that started the same period with us or they had already started when we entered internet, – and we are talking about magazines with funds and serious support – don’t exist anymore. They are not even history, they are forgotten.

Ovi magazine on the other side is still here, following exactly the same principals since day one, working the same way, always low profile without help and strange attachments and always loyal to its readership.

Actually talking with a friend the other day he told me that eleven years with daily presence and involvement to contemporary issues the way we do is too much for any kind of magazine, print – on line or anything else. But …who counts? The only thing that interest us at the moment is planning our next moves and get ready to face new challenges.

And there are challenges. Democracy is in serious trouble all around the world and the economic problems are just the peak of the iceberg. Marine Le Pen is here and I’m afraid she’s not going to go soon. Donald Trump is here and there are plenty around him to replace him if he goes and to be honest I have no idea who is worse. Timo Soini is government in Finland and Nikos Michaloliakos salutes the swastika in Greece. Viktor Orbán of Hungary keeps showing us that Nazism, racism and prejudice is strong and alive and that before I move to Africa or Asia.

On its 11th year Ovi seems more necessary than ever. Now it is time for us to stand, really stand for democracy and culture and I’m afraid the enemy is getting stronger every day.

Your support is important for many reasons and your contribution valuable.

A big thank you is in order for all these people from all around the world that contribute day after day to Ovi magazine with their articles, their drawings, illustrations, fiction, photographs with their believes and thoughts.

A big thank you to everybody who reads Ovi and to this so loyal readership all these years.

Last and not least we thank all these people who support our social media campaigns by sharing our posts and digital posters. The message is clear, democracy – freedom – education – work for all. Thank you all.

book_70This time we thought to celebrate our birthday in a bit different and very Ovi way. So we are publishing a book “The Refugee Tree”, written by four beautiful ladies, Katerina Charisi – Gordana Mudri – Shia Perrou – Natasa Tsitsiridaki, the ladies’ fight club of Ovi, and it is about refugees. Another huge issue that has unveiled the darkest side of the democratic west.

Please download the book here and join these ladies in their passion and fight.

For one more time a big thank you to all of you who are part of the Ovi Team, despite small family arguments, we all have the same aims. A big thank you to the Ovi readership for all the support and please don’t forget, now we need to be united more than any other time and next year is going to be very critical not for Ovi but for democracy all around the world.

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A Brief History of the End of the Comments

From the magazine “Wire”

Earlier this week, Vice’s technology and science news site Motherboard dropped its comments section, opting to replace it with an old school “letters to the editor” feature. Then Reddit launched a news site called Upvoted that didn’t include a comments section. (You can still comment on the stories on Reddit itself.)

What’s going on here? For years, comment boxes have been a staple of the online experience. You’ll find them everywhere, from The New York Times to Fox News to The Economist. But as online audiences have grown, the pain of moderating conversations on the web has grown, too. And in many cases, the most vibrant conversations about a particular article or topic are happening on sites like Facebook and Twitter. So many media companies are giving up on comments, at least for now. So far this year, Bloomberg, The Verge, The Daily Beast and now Motherboard have all dropped their comments feature.

While it’s too soon to say that comment sections are outright dying— there are plenty of major sites that still have comments, including WIRED—it’s safe to say there’s a trend towards replacing them with something else. Here’s a brief history of major publications pulling the plug on comments. Feel free to suggest additions to the timeline in, well, the comments.

Ovi_001September 24, 2012: The Atlantic launches the business news site Quartz without a comments section, but adds comments in the form of “annotations” nearly a year later.

September 24, 2013: Popular Science becomes one of the first major publications to ditch its comments feature, citing studies that found that blog comments can have a profound effect on readers’ perceptions of science. “If you carry out those results to their logical end—commenters shape public opinion; public opinion shapes public policy; public policy shapes how and whether and what research gets funded—you start to see why we feel compelled to hit the “off” switch,” former digital editor Suzanne LaBarre wrote in the site’s announcement.

April 12, 2014: The Chicago Sun-Times suspends its comment feature, citing concerns over the “tone and quality” of the comments while its team developed a new discussion system. Most articles on the site still don’t allow comments.

August 2014: CNN quietly disables comments on most stories sometime during the protests in Ferguson, Missouri.

November 7, 2014: Reuters drops comments for all of its stories except its opinion pieces, saying that social media is a better place for discussion. “Those communities offer vibrant conversation and, importantly, are self-policed by participants to keep on the fringes those who would abuse the privilege of commenting,” executive editor Dan Colarusso wrote in the company’s announcement.

November 20, 2014: Popular tech news site Recode follows suit, also citing social media as the best way for readers to provide feedback.

December 15, 2014: The winter of comment discontent kicks into high gear as The Week pulls the plug on comments.

December 16, 2014: The very next day, so does the millennial-focused Mic.com, proving that comment-phobia isn’t just for old media.

January 27, 2015 Bloomberg’s website relaunches with no comments.

July 6, 2015: Tech news site The Verge announces that it’s shutting off comments for most articles for the duration fo the summer. Most articles still don’t have comments enabled today.

uly 7, 2015: WIRED launches our new “short post” format, which doesn’t include a comments section.

July 27, 2015: Internet community news site The Daily Dot switches off comments.

August 19, 2015: So does The Daily Beast, but the site claims that it’s working on “multiple ways to bring you an upgraded commenting experience.”

October 5, 2015: Vice Motherboard announces that it’s replacing its comments feature with a weekly “letters to the editor” feature.

October 6, 2015: Reddit launches its news site Upvoted, which has no way to comment on or “upvote” things directly on the site. You can guess where the site’s owners hope discussions will take place.

Klint Finley

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